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Franciscan Sisters Rome, 3 Days Pilgrimage to Lanciano
The Eucharistic Miracle City

The Franciscan Sisters, Rome Community went on a 3-Days pilgrimage to the ancient Eucharisic Miracle City, Lanciano, a town and commune in the province of Chieti, part of the Abruzzo region of central Italy on the 27th of December to 31st December 2016.

Eucharistic Miracle

("This is my body. This is my blood"), with doubt in his soul, the priest is said to have seen the bread change into living flesh and the wine change into blood which coagulated into five globules, irregular and differing in shape and size.
Linoli's released his findings in March 1971. According to his study, the flesh is human cardiac tissue. He said he found proteins in the blood, in the same normal proportions (percentage-wise) as are found in the sero-proteic make-up of fresh normal blood. Linoli found no trace of preservatives. The Basilian monks kept custody of the elements until their departure in 1175. They were succeeded by Benedictine monks in 1176.The elements can still be seen today. The flesh, which is the same size as the large host used in the Latin Church, is fibrous and light brown in colour and becomes rose-colored when lighted from the back. The blood consists of five coagulated globules and has an earthy colour resembling the yellow of ochre.

On behalf of the congregation, Sr Gerard endorsed the visitor”s book reserved for prominent dignitaries, therein we found the signature of St John Paul 11 when as the Cardinal of Krawkow visited the Church of St Francis in Lanciano, Italy.

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.The Miracle of Lanciano dates back to the eighth century. It has been certified by the Catholic Church as a Eucharistic miracle. Today the miracle is in the Church of San Francesco in Piazza Plebiscito. Lanciano.
According to Richmond's ancient accounts, in the city of Lanciano, Italy. Then known as Anxanum, around 700, a Basilian hieromonk
was assigned to celebrate Mass at the monastery of St. Longinus. Celebrating in the Latin Rite and using unleavened bread, the monk had doubts about the Real Presence of Jesus Christ in the Holy Eucharist. During the Mass, when he said the Words of Consecration